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Historic Building Assessments

I have had the good fortune of working on quite a variety of building restoration and rehabilitation studies across the State of New Hampshire. Representative projects are listed below, and writing examples are available upon request.

Col. Ebenezer Hinsdale House Historic Building Assessment

Hinsdale, NH

In approximately 1759, Col. Ebenezer Hinsdale (1706-63) built the main block and service ell of the Col. Hinsdale House next to the site of an earlier garrison (Fort Hinsdale). Though the exact date of the kitchen ell is uncertain, it is said to contain timbers that were recycled from his 1742 fort. Fort Hinsdale was one of several forts along the Connecticut River in what was then Northfield, MA, and contained a garrison, grist mill, and trading post (Hinsdale also kept another mercantile business at his large property in Deerfield, MA which still stands and is now a part of Historic Deerfield). Hinsdale died just four years after the house was constructed, and it is unclear if he ever actually resided in the house that bears his name. His wife, Abigail Williams, remarried twice after his death, outlived all three husbands, and returned to the house after the Revolutionary War, and remained there until her own death in 1787.

After Abigail’s death, the house was purchased by the Marsh Family. In approximately 1810, the north ell was constructed by widow Anna Marsh. This Federal style single-story ell housed a large ball or music room that was fit for entertaining.

Upon Anna’s death, the property was deeded to the Liscom Family. The house, and surrounding farmland stayed in this family from 1835 to 1998. The house remained largely intact through this long chapter of its history save for the addition of a second-floor bathroom in ca. 1930. The house was purchased by the Hinsdale Historical Society in 2009 with help from a grant from NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). Over the years the Historical Society has undertaken several restoration projects, however, they recently contacted the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance for help with establishing a long-term maintenance and restoration plan for the Georgian house in partnership with Katie Sutherland of KCS Architects.

Client: Hinsdale Historical Society

Completed: April 2022

United Baptist Church of Lakeport Historic Building Assessment

Laconia, NH

In the spring of 1891, Montpelier Vermont architect/builder George H. Guernsey (1839-1900) prepared plans and specifications for the new Park Street Baptist Church (now United Baptist Church of Lakeport). Like many other architects working in the second half of the nineteenth-century, Guernsey worked in a variety of styles, particularly the Italianate, Romanesque, Gothic Revival, and Queen Anne. In reaction to the emphasis on formality, proportion, and order of the previous tend of Neoclassicism, Victorian architects turned to the pleasing variety, irregularity, asymmetry and contrasting textures of earlier medieval styles for inspiration. With the advent of balloon framing techniques in the late nineteenth-century, architects were given free expression of their imagination. Instead of designing wooden building frames around the basic shape of a box, they found themselves free to add embellishment upon embellishment as they created more complicated frameworks off of the basic box design. As a result, many late Victorian styles, most notably the Queen Anne, incorporate frequent bay windows, towers, wall insets and projections, breaking up the horizontal continuity of the wall plane. Similarly, devices created a discontinuity of the vertical plane with devices such as large roof overhangs and changes in building sheathing such as combining clapboards with shingles or brick.

The United Baptist Church is constructed with transitional framing with parts of the building constructed utilizing timber-framing techniques, and parts using much lighter dimensional lumber framing. Though the tower sits on a very solid base, the light framing of the tower is undersized for its size, and the weight of the bell, clock, and slate roof. Realizing that the National Register listed building needs structural assistance, the church reached out to the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance for help, and enlisted myself, Arron Sturgis and Jessica MilNeil of Preservation Timber Framing with Jared Guilmett of Misiaszek Turpin pllc architects to help them formulate a game-plan for the building’s long-term restoration. 

Client: United Baptist Church of Lakeport

Completed: March 2022

Tilton Town Hall Historic Building Assessment

Tilton, NH

The Historic Building Assessment of the 1879 Tilton Town Hall was funded in part by a grant from the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) and performed in partnership with Norman E. Larson, AIA of Christopher P. Williams, Architects. The Tilton Town Hall was constructed by local builder Leonard Conant in 1879-80, ten years after the village of Sanbornton Bridge severed from Sanbornton and became the new Town of Tilton. Likely designed by Concord architect Edward Dow, the construction of the Town Hall was financed by local philanthropist, Charles Elliot Tilton. The Town Hall is part of the National Register-listed Tilton Downtown Historic District. Through its lifetime, the Victorian building has been home to several local businesses, including a butcher, a furniture store, men's clothing, the Tilton Post Office and others. The entire building is now used as municipal offices. The study provides a long-term maintenance plan for the historic building as well as suggestions for how to bring the public building into compliance with modern New Hampshire building codes.

Client: Town of Tilton

Completed: February 2022

Windham Town Hall Condition Assessment

Windham, NH

The Condition Assessment of the Windham Town hall was done in partnership with Stephen Bedard of Bedard Preservation & Restoration and funded in part by an Assessment Grant from the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. The current Town Hall was originally constructed as the second Windham Meetinghouse in 1798 to serve both town municipal as well as spiritual functions. By this date, several members of the community had complained that the first meetinghouse (located to the southeast on the opposite side of Cobbetts Pond) was not conveniently located. The geographic center of the town was determined, and a new building was constructed under the watchful eye of master workman, Squire Gregg. As with other meetinghouses, the building took several years to complete, and it was not until 1805 that the gallery was fitted up for the choir. At this time, the building was five bays in length with a central entrance on what is now the south side and twin porches on either gable end to provide access to the second-floor gallery. The interior likely contained box pews, and the pulpit was located at the middle of the north side, beneath an arched window.

A new Presbyterian Church was built next door in 1833, and the building was left as a purely municipal building. Architect Joseph B. Sawyer of Manchester was hired to renovate the building in 1868, and present building is largely the result of this 19th century renovation. In the 1990s, an addition was constructed at the back (west) elevation, and the first floor was divided into offices. Steve and I worked to decipher the story of this building and create a plan for its future.

Client: Town of Windham

Completed:January 2022

Orange Town House, HBA

Orange, NH

The Orange Town House was constructed in 1895 as a dual-purpose building to serve as a Town House for all municipal activity and to serve as a district school house. This vernacular interpretation of the Italianate style of architecture was the first purpose-built meetinghouse for town activities which had occurred in a combination of private residences, school buildings, and a nearby church during the first century of the town’s history. Though the interior of the school was remodeled in 1943, the tiny town could no longer support a school house by 1949 when the school was closed and local school children have since been sent to Canaan and Grafton for their education. The building then housed the library from approximately 1950 to 1992 (when it also closed) and the Orange Historical Museum from 1976 to present. In the early 1980s a single-story addition was added to the building to create an accessible town meeting place in the first floor, and in 2014 the Orange Town House was listed to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places. Realizing that the building needs some structural upgrades and repairs, concerned citizens contacted the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance for help. With aid from a NH Preservation Alliance Assessment grant, I conducted an historic building assessment of the building with Stephen Bedard of Bedard Preservation & Restoration and Chris Fournier of HEB Engineering in order to help create a long-term preservation plan for the building that ensures that it can remain an active part of the Town of Orange for many years to come.

Client: Town of Orange

Completed: January 2022

Ash Cottage Histoic Buiding Assessment

Hebron, NH

Ash Cottage was constructed in about 1800 as a small single-family residence on a much larger farm. The building started as a very modest single-story cape at the turn of the 19th century with subsequent tenants adding wings and ells over the next 150 years as the building evolved to fit their needs. Originally part of a large subsistence farm, the building was used as a summer residence in the 20th century when the last major addition was constructed. Since 1979, the building has been the property of New Hampshire Audubon, who have used the house as lodging for seasonal staff as well as small educational workshops that are open to the public. The Historic Building Assessment conduced in partnership with Stephen Bedard of Bedard Preservation & Restoration and was funded in part by a 2021 grant from the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. The report developed a history of the building from combining documentary research with forensic analysis, identified character-defining features of the structure and used this information to create a long-term rehabilitation plan for the building.

Client: Audubon Society of New Hampshire

Completed: December 2021

Monadnock Mill No. 1: Character-Defining Featues Report

Claremont, NH

Over the summer of 2021, I was contacted by the NH Department of Administrative Service to help them create a document to help guide both the local heritage commission and potential future owners of one of the Monadnock Mill Buildings with future rehabilitation projects. The Monadnock Mill No. 1 is the oldest structure in the mills complex and was constructed in the 1830s. The building was surveyed by the Historic American Engineering Record in 1978 and listed to the National Register in 1979. In the early 1980s, the building was purchased by the State of NH and renovated into State Offices. Now, as the State explores their options for the future of the building, they have a document that highlights which key features are most important to help tell the history of the building and should be given priority in future redevelopment and or restoration projects.

Client: NH Department of Administrative Services

Completed: September 2021

Pinkerton Old Academy

Derry, NH

The Historic Building Assessment of the ca. 1815 Old Academy Building at Pinkerton Academy was done in partnership with Jay Doherty of Lavallee/Brensinger, Architects through the Assessment Grant program of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. When it was built, the five-bay federal-style building was closer to the crest of the hill at the approximate location of the brick Romanesque Revival Pinkerton Hall. In ca. 1828, the Greek Revival entrance pavilion was added to the building, and topped with the bell tower. When the Romanesque Revival style Pinkerton Academy Hall was constructed in 1885, the Old Academy was moved south and to the present location. The building continued to be used as classroom space by a variety of school programs until 1982, when it was renovated for use as an Alumni Hall. The report presented a long-term maintenance plan for the building, including how to adapt the structure for the 21st century without detracting from its historic character

Client: Pinkerton Academy

Completed: June 2021

United Congregational Church & Horse Sheds Condition Assessment

Sullivan, NH

I worked with Brian Gallien of Ironwood Restoration to conduct a Condition Assessment of the United Congregational Church and Horse Sheds in Sullivan through the Assessment Grant program of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. Constructed in 1848 as the first purpose-built church in Sullivan (replacing two earlier meetinghouses), the church and associated horse sheds were listed to the NH State Register of Historic Places in 2018. The study was initiated after members of the church became concerned about the structure of their tower, so Brian and I have been working to develop a plan to fix the tower, develop a maintenance schedule for the building, and compile a detailed history of the structure.

Client: United Congregational Church of Sullivan

Completed: February 2021

Antrim Grange No. 98 Conditions Assessment Report

Antrim, NH

I worked in conjunction with Brian Gallien of Ironwood Restoration to conduct a Condition Assessment of the Antrim Grange No. 98 through the Assessment Grant program of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance . The story of the Grange building began in 1785, when Antrim constructed their first Meetinghouse on top of Meetinghouse Hill (in Old Antrim Center), next to the Meetinghouse Cemetery. Over time the population centers of Antrim shifted away from the hilltop, especially after the construction of Clinton Rd/NH Route 31 in 1820 diverted traffic away from the steep hill. The village moved south to the base of the hill, and, eventually, a new church was constructed in the new village center in 1826. The old twin-porch meetinghouse was deconstructed in 1832 after sitting vacant for several years, and parts of the second floor and roof frame were moved down the hill and incorporated into the new Town Hall (now Grange). In 1876-1877, the Town added a bay to the north of the building to house a stage at the end of the hall. By the 1890s, the population of "South Village" had grown significantly in response to the success of mills along the Contoocook River, and a new Town hall was constructed there in 1893 leaving the building empty once more. Since 1894, the building has been home to the Antrim Grange No. 98.

The skeleton of the building reflects at least three distinctive stages: 1785 meetinghouse frame of Col. William Gregg of Londonderry, the 1832 addition, and changes around the turn of the 20th century when the property was acquired by the Grange. Brian and I decoded this evolution and help the Grange develop a "game plan" for restoring the important building and allowing the Grange to continue its use well into the future.

Client: Antrim Grange No. 98

Completed: January 2021

Wentworth-Brown House Condition Assessment Report Addendum

Haverhill, NH

An update to the 2017 condition assessment of the Wentworth-Brown House was funded by the Community Development Finance Authority and conducted in cooperation with Stephen Bedard of Bedard Preservation & Restoration in order to develop a more detailed rehabilitation plan for the expansive connected building for Haverhill Heritage, Inc.. Through the process of investigation, we discovered that the building started in 1805 as a 3 by 3 bay hip-roofed Federal-style house (now the west end of the main house) with kitchen ell and detached carriage barn, owned by a local banker and lawyer. The main house was expanded and renovated through a series of building campaigns in 1821 and ca. 1850, and the ell was widened and paired with the main house under a new hip roof. Some Greek Revival updates were also made to the interior during this time. In the 1870s, the property was purchased by a farming family, and it is likely that they inserted the "little house" between the kitchen and existing carriage barn to create additional living space. The "little house" contains parts of an earlier building, which made unravelling the historic evolution of the structure quite a difficult but rewarding puzzle. The hen house and large horse barn to the east were also added at about this time, creating the over 185 foot long building we see today. The house was listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1987 as a contributing resource to the Haverhill Corner Historic District.

The updated assessment report created a detailed study of the historic evolution of the property and will provide a detailed road map for the continued rehabilitation of this building in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties and will aid the non-profit as they seek future funding for their restoration efforts.

Client: Haverhill Heritage, Inc.

Completed: December 2020

Amos J. Blake House Museum Historic Building Conditions Assessment

Fitzwilliam, NH

The Historic Building Conditions Assessment of the Amos J. Blake House Museum is being conducted in partnership with Brian Gallien of Ironwood Restoration through the Assessment Grant program of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. The house was constructed by Levi Haskell in 1837. The large Greek Revival building originally housed a series of stores in the first floor with residential and storage space above. In ca. 1863, Amos J. Blake (1836-1925) opened his law offices in the southeast corner of the building. Blake was a prominent Fitzwilliam citizen, and lived in the house until his death in 1925. The building was later transferred to the Fitzwilliam Historical Society in 1965 by Blake's descendants.

Client: Fitzwilliam Historical Society

Completed: August 2020

John P. Chase Farmhouse Historic Building Assessment

Epping, NH

The Historic Building Assessment of the John Prescott Chase Farmhouse was for the Southeast Land Trust of New Hampshire (SELT) in cooperation with Stephen Bedard of Bedard Preservation & Restoration and Sheldon Pennoyer, AIA, of Sheldon Pennoyer Architects. The Georgian Farmhouse was constructed in ca. 1785, likely by Moses Davis, and was home to John Prescott Chase from 1839 until 1883. Chase updated many of the outdated Georgian features shortly after his marriage in 1842 to reflect the popular Greek Revival style. The farm was later sold to the Quincy family and run as a dairy farm which supplied milk to RM Hood. The property was listed to the NH State Register of Historic Places in 2014, and was acquired by SELT with the assistance of partner organizations including both the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) and NH Conservation & Heritage License Plate Program in 2015. SELT decided to conduct an assessment to help guide the reuse plans for the building within the Secretary of the Interior's Standards as part of SELT's long-term plans to revitalize the working farm to inspire the public about conservation.

Client: Southeast Land Trust of New Hampshire

Completed: May 2020

Stratford Grange Historic Building Assessment

Stratford, NH

The Historic Building Assessment of the Stratford Grange is being conducted in partnership with Oliver Fifield of Oliver Fifield Traditional Woodworking for the town of Stratford with the aid of a grant through the assessment grant program of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. The Stratford Grange was listed to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places in 2017 for its role in the political, governmental, and social history of Stratford and as a well-preserved example of a nineteenth-century rural New Hampshire meetinghouse. The building was first constructed ca. 1820, as the second Stratford Meetinghouse (reusing framing elements of the first, 1808 meetinghouse). It has been used as a grange hall since 1896, and sits along the west side of Route 3, between the villages of Stratford Hollow and North Stratford and across the street from the Stratford Center Cemetery

Client: Town of Stratford

Completed: May 2020

Golden Rod Grange Historic Building Conditons Assessment

Swanzey, NH

The Historic Building Assessment was made possible through a grant from the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance and conducted in partnership with Michael Petrovick Architects, PLLC. The Golden Rod Grange #114 was constructed in 1915-16 and designed specifically for Grange use with a lodge room with stage for dramatic productions; a dining/meeting hall; and a kitchen. In 1991, the Grange offered the building to the Town of Swanzey. Since 1993, the Swanzey Preservation Society has been working to rehabilitate the building for use as a centralized meeting place for town activities. The building was individually listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1994 under Criterion A for significance in social history.

Client: Town of Swanzey

Completed: May 2020

Ashland Town Hall Historic Structures Report

Ashland, NH

Historic Structures Report of the Ashland Town Hall in Ashland, NH for the Town of Ashland in cooperation with Norman E. Larson, AIA of Christopher P. Williams, Architects and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The Ashland Town hall was constructed in 1871 as the first municipal building of the new Town of Ashland after it had split off from Holderness in 1868. The building has served several functions throughout its life, beginning as a Town Hall, then serving as a vocation school building for the Ashland School district between 1953 and 1971, and returning to use as the Town Hall in 1971. Listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983, the building is significant for its central role in the civic and social history of Ashland and as an example of the traditional New England Town Hall.

Client: Town of Ashland

Completed: February 2020

Littleton Community Center Annex Historic Building Assessment

Littleton, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the former Charles F. Eastman Carriage House in cooperation with Jay Barrett of Barrett Architecture, and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The Littleton Community Center Annex was built in ca. 1884 as a carriage house and was likely designed by prominent Worcester, Massachusetts architect, Stephen C. Earle (1839-1913). In 1919, the Eastman family estate, which then included the house (Littleton Community Center), carriage barn, ice house, and automotive garage, was purchased by the Littleton Community Center to create a community gather space as a living memorial for the veterans of the Great War (World War I). In 1958-59, the first-floor of the carriage house was renovated to create Teen Town, a hangout for local youth. The building was used by youth groups through 2011, when it was closed to the public due to structural issues. The assessment explores the history of the structure, identifies character-defining features, and develops a rehabilitation plan to rehabilitate the historic building to create a public welcome center for the Town of Littleton.

Client: Littleton Community Center

Completed: January 2020

Greenfield Meetinghouse Historic Building Assessment

Greenfield, NH

LCHIP-funded Historic Building Assessment of the Greenfield Meetinghouse in Greenfield, NH for the Town of Greenfield in cooperation with Misiaszek Turpin pllc architects, Rist-Frost-Shumway Engineering, and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The assessment of the 1795 building aims to address structural and code issues within the space, create a comprehensive history of the structure, develop a long-term maintenance plan for the building, and help the Town of Greenfield ensure that this historic structure continues to be a part of the community into the 21st century

Client: Town of Greenfield

Completed: September 2019

Stratford Hollow United-Methodist Church Historic Building Assessment

Stratford, NH

New Hampshire Preservation Alliance-funded Historic Building Assessment of the former Stratford Hollow United-Methodist Church for the Cohos Historical Society. First constructed as a Greek Revival building in the 1850s, the church was heavily renovated in 1896 to serve the village of Stratford Hollow. In 2002, the building was purchased by the Cohos Historical Society. In 2010, the building was listed to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places for its role in the social history and community development of Stratford and as an excellent local example of shingle-style architecture. The Historical Society is working to restore the church building while creating an accessible public museum and meeting space for the community.

Client: Cohos Historical Society

Completed: June 2019

Mt. Caesar Union Library Historic Building Assessment

Swanzey, NH

New Hampshire Preservation Alliance-funded Historic Building Assessment of the Mt. Caesar Union Library in Swanzey in cooperation with KCS Architects. The Greek Revival style library was constructed in 1842 as the private Mount Caesar Academy. The school closed in 1866 and was sold to the Mt. Caesar Union Library Association in 1885. Through the assessment, a rehabilitation plan has been created to bring the building into compliance with modern building code while fulfilling the programmatic needs of the expanding Library.

Client: Mt. Caesar Union Library Association

Completed: June 2019

New England Masonic Charitale Institute National Register Nominaton & Historic Building Assessment

Effingham, NH

Initially hired by the Town of Effingham to complete a National Register of Historic Places Nomination for the Effingham Masonic Institute, the project was expanded to include an Historic Building Assessment in cooperation with Norman E. Larson, AIA of Christopher P. Williams, Architects and the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. The Italianate New England Masonic Charitable Institute was built in 1858 overlooking the village of Drake's Corner. The second floor was outfitted for use by the Charter Oak Lodge No. 58, and the hall was decorated with the elaborate wall frescoes of Boston artist Philip A. Butler (1829-1916). The first floor operated as a private school between 1861 and ca. 1880. In 1891, the first floor of the building was re-purposed as the Effingham Town Hall. In 1893, the Effingham Public Library moved into a room in the first floor. Since 2004, the entire first floor has been occupied by the Library, with the Charter Oak Lodge continuing to utilize the second floor. The Masonic Charitable Institute is significant for its architecture, and central role in the educational history of the Town and region as the only known example of a Masonic school in the United States.

Client: Town of Effingham

Completed: June 2019

Listed to the National Register of Historic Places: September 19, 2019

Charles E. Tilton Mansion Historic Building Assessment

Tilton, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the former Charles E. Tilton Mansion (now Lucian Hunt Library) in cooperation with Samyn-D'Elia Architects and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The Tilton Mansion was built over a series of phases starting in ca. 1861 as the home of prominent Tilton resident, Charles Elliott Tilton. The house remained in the Tilton family until 1952, when it was sold to another private family. In 1962, the building was purchased by the Tilton School and was renovated for use as the school's library. The mansion as individually listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 as having state-wide significance in the areas of architecture and commerce. The building is a very well-preserved example of late 19th century residential architecture, illustrating the tastes and trends of Victorian architectural styles. The early design of the building in ca. 1861-1864 represents a very early example of the Second Empire style in the State of New Hampshire, possibly designed by prominent Concord architect, Edward Dow. The design of the house pre-dates the New Hampshire State House expansion, and may represent the earliest domestic Second Empire style building in New Hampshire. The later, Islamic Revival details of the porch are also highly significant as they represent a style that is virtually unknown in the State. The building assessment presents the historical context of the Mansion, outlines the character-defining elements of the building, details the current building condition, and lays out the scope of work for a series of potential future renovation projects that will protect the integrity of the structure for years to come.

Client: Tilton School

Completed: May 2019

Canterbury Shaker Village Cart Shed Historic Building Assessment

Canterbury, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the Canterbury Shaker Village Cart Shed for Canterbury Shaker Village, Inc., in cooperation with former New Hampshire State Architectural Historian Dr. James Garvin, engineer Keith Donington, Canterbury Shaker Village staff member David Ford, and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The study of the 1840 Cart Shed will determine the physical needs of the structure and help determine an interpretive plan for the building.

Client: Canterbury Shaker Village, Inc.

Completed: March 2019

Belmont Public Library, Historic Building Assessment

Belmont, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the Belmont Public Library in Belmont, NH for the Belmont Public Library Trustees in cooperation with Norman E. Larson, AIA of Christopher P. Williams, Architects and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The 1927-1928 library and its furnishings were gifted to the Town by George & Walter Duffy, the owners of the Belmont Hosiery Company (operating out of the Belmont Mill next door). The library as designed by well-known Hanover, NH firm Wells & Hudson and is an excellent example of a small Colonial Revival public library. The building was listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

Client: Belmont Public Library Trustees

Completed: June 2018

Belknap Mill

Laconia, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the Belknap Mill Building in Laconia, NH for the Belknap Mill Society in cooperation with Misiaszek Turpin pllc architects, Rist-Frost-Shumway Engineering, Resilient Buildings Group, Inc and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The Belknap Mill was listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, after it was narrowly saved from demolition. Built in 1823, the mill is heralded as the oldest brick mill in New England. The mill was very modern for its time and integrated the entire textile manufacturing process under one roof. The building is highly significant for its architecture and retains many character-defining features of an early mill. The Belknap Mill is also significant for its central role in the history of Laconias industrial revolution and the important part it played in helping to establish New Hampshires preservation movement.

Client: Belknap Mill Society

Completed: June 2017

Ingalls Memorial Library

Rindge, NH Historic Building Assessment & NH State Register Nomination

Historic Building Assessment for the Ingalls Memorial Library prepared for the Ingalls 1894 Association. Constructed in 1994 and designed by noted Fitchburg, MA architect H. M. Francis, the Ingalls Memorial Library is significant for its central role in the community as the only public library in the Town of Rindge from 1895 to the present day and as an example of a Romanesque Revival building.

Client: Ingalls 1894 Association

Completed: August 2016

Listed to the NH State Register of Historic Places: October 2016

Rochester City Hall Annex Historic Building Assessment

Rochester, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the Rochester City Hall Annex, conducted for the City of Rochester in cooperation with Oak Point Associates. The Rochester City Hall Annex is a contributing element of the National Register-listed Rochester Commercial Industrial Historic District. It was constructed in 1905 as a horse-powered fire station and was desigend by Providence, RI achitectural firm William R. Walter & Sons. In the 1970s, a new Rochester Fire Station was built next door and the Annex was gutted, given a new brick veneer, and convered to a Police Station. At the time of the study, it had been unoccupied since 2004, while the City explored possible rehabilitation options.

Client: City of Rochester

Completed: March 2016

Rogers House, Historic Building Assessment

Lebanon, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the Rogers House senior living facility, conducted for the Lebanon Housing Authority in cooperation with Jerry Wuebbolt of Right-Trak Design, Inc. The Rogers House is a contributing element of the National Register-listed Colburn Park Historic District. It was constructed in 1911 as a hotel by George Rogers, a prominent local businessman whose influence can be detected throughout the City of Lebanon. The Rogers Hotel was acquired and converted into designated senior housing in the late 1960s, and renamed Rogers House.

Client: Lebanon Housing Authority

Completed: June 2015

Creek Farm Historic Structures Report

Portsmouth, NH

Historic Structure Report of the Arthur Astor Carey summer house (aka Creek Farm) for the NH Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests with Norman E. Larson, AIA of Christopher P. Williams, Architects of Meredith, NH. Creek Farm was designed by Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow, Jr. of Boston. Construction began on the structure in 1887 with at least four major architectural phases completed before 1900. The house is an outstanding representative of the summer home movement in New Hampshire, a rare survivor of the artistic summer colony at Little Harbor, and is significant for its associations with both Arthur Astor Carey (1857-1923) and Alexander Wadwsorth Longfellow, Jr (1854-1934).

Client: Society for the Protection of NH Forests

Completed: May 2015

Pine Ledge, Historic Structures Report

Holderness, NH

Historic Structures report and architectural analysis prepared for Building Investigation and Evaluation class insctured by retired NH State Architectural Historian, Dr. James L. Garvin. Pine Ledge is a contributing element to the Shepard Hill National Register Historic District and is a fine example of a shingle-style summer cotttage. It is signficant for its high level of architectural integrity and for its association with the history of tourism around the Squam Lakes.

Plymouth State Univeristy MA in Historic Preserviaton Class

Completed: August, 2013

Uvdal Stave Church

Numendal Norway

"From Dragon Myth to the Gospels: The Stave Church at Uvdal" presented the first in-depth analysis of the stave church in English. This undergraduate thesis explored the connection between architectural structure and ornamentation and the conversion from paganism to Christianity in a rural Norwegian parish. Uvdal has been dated using dendrochronology to 1167, and is a fine example of one of the few surviving typical parish churches that once dotted the Medieval Norwegian countryside.

Undergraduate Thesis: Bard College

Completed: May 2004.