Belmont Public Library Historic Building Assessment
Belmont, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the Belmont Public Library in Belmont, NH for the Belmont Public Library Trustees in cooperation with Norman E. Larson, AIA of Christopher P. Williams, Architects and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP).  The 1927-1928 library and its furnishings were gifted to the Town by George & Walter Duffy, the owners of the Belmont Hosiery Company (operating out of the Belmont Mill next door).  The library as designed by well-known Hanover, NH firm Wells & Hudson and is an excellent example of a small Colonial Revival public library.  The building was listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

Belmont Public Library Trustees, to be completed June 2018

NH Planning Survey Project & Model Survey of Center Harbor, NH
Center Harbor, NH

Grant-funded project to create a new process for conducting town-wide survey that can be used across the state by other New Hampshire communities. This process will encourage a greater level of structured community involvement and professional preservation analysis to increase engagement and reduce some costs while increasing the usefulness of the resulting document.  This planning survey model will identify areas with a high potential for eligible properties and local landmarks, will make recommendations for future survey, and will cross-reference with hazard maps, flood risk maps, zoning maps and other town resources.  During this phased project, I will create a new guideline for conducting town-wide survey and then use the Town of Center Harbor as a test-subject for perfecting the guideline.

New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources, to be completed June 2018

Sanbornville Historic Resources Area Form
Wakefield, NH

Historical resources survey of the Village of Sanbornville in Wakefield, NH completed as part of a Certified Local Government Grant for the Wakefield Heritage Commission. The village grew up as Wolfeboro Junction at around the intersection of the Eastern Railroad and the Wolfeboro Branch Railroad after 1871. Over the next twenty years the village grew rapidly and by 1895 the municipal center had shifted from Wakefield Village to the newly named Sanbornville.

Wakefield Heritage Commission, to be completed September 2017

Belknap Mill Building Assessment
Laconia, NH

Historic Building Assessment of the Belknap Mill Building in Laconia, NH for the Belknap Mill Society in cooperation with Misiaszek Turpin pllc architects, Rist-Frost-Shumway Engineering, Resilient Buildings Group, Inc and the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP). The Belknap Mill was listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, after it was narrowly saved from demolition. Built in 1823, the mill is heralded as the oldest brick mill in New England. The mill was very modern for its time and integrated the entire textile manufacturing process under one roof. The building is highly significant for its architecture and retains many character-defining features of an early mill. The Belknap Mill is also significant for its central role in the history of Laconia’s industrial revolution and the important part it played in helping to establish New Hampshire’s preservation movement.

Belknap Mill Society, completed June 2017

Center Harbor Village School, NH State Register Nomination
Center Harbor, NH

New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places Nomination for the Center Harbor Village School, prepared for the Town of Center Harbor.  Constructed in 1886, the Village School is significant for the role it played in the educational history of Center Harbor and as an example of a Queen Anne schoolhouse.  Designed by well-known Laconia architect A. L. Davis, the one-room school expanded first in 1902, when a secondary classroom was added off of the north side of the structure, allowing the school to be separated into a Primary Department and a Grammar Grade.  The building was expanded a second time in 1928-1929 when a second addition added more cloak room and expanded the kitchen area. The school served a large portion of Center Harbor’s residents from its construction, through several school consolidations, until 1970, when the school closed and the Center Harbor children were sent to Meredith.

Town of Center Harbor, Completed September 2016
Listed ot the NH State Register of Historic Places in October 2016

Ingalls Memorial Library, Historic Building Assessment & NH State Register Nomination
Rindge, NH
Historic Building Assessment for the Ingalls Memorial Library prepared for the Ingalls 1894 Association.  Constructed in 1894 and designed by noted Fitchburg, MA architect H. M. Francis, the Ingalls Memorial Library is significant for its central role in the community as the only public library in the Town of Rindge from 1895 to the present day and as an example of a Romanesque Revival public building.

Ingalls 1894 Association, Assessment completed August 2016
Listed ot the NH State Register of Historic Places in October 2016

Belmont Bandstand, NH State Register Nomination
Belmont, NH
New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places Nomination for the Belmont Bandstand prepared for the Belmont Heritage Commission.  The Bandstand was constructed in 1908 and is significant for its central role in the social history of Belmont, its role in the brass band movement that proliferation between the Civil War and World War I across America, and as one of New Hampshire’s best examples of a Victorian bandstand.
Belmont Heritage Commission, Completed March 2016

Listed to the NH State Register of Historic Places in May 2016

Rochester City Hall Annex, Historic Building Assessment
Rochester, NH
Historic Building Assessment of the Rochester City Hall Annex, conducted for the City of Rochester in cooperation with Oak Point Associates.  The Rochester City Hall Annex is a contributing element of the National Register-listed Rochester Commercial Industrial Historic District.  It was constructed in 1905 as a horse-powered fire station and was designed by Providence, RI architectural Firm, William R. Walker & Sons.  In the 1970s, a new Rochester Fire Station was built next door and the Annex was gutted, given a new brick veneer, and converted to a Police Station.  It has been unoccupied since 2004 as possible new uses are explored.

City of Rochester, completed March 2016.

Mizpah Spring Hut, Determination of Eligibility
Bean’s Purchase, NH
Determination of Eligibility for Mizpah Spring Hut for the Appalachian Mountain Club.  The youngest of the AMC huts, Mizpah was designed by Benjamin Stein of Burlington, VT and constructed in 1964 at the site of the former Mizpah Spring shelter.  Mizpah is significant as part of the Appalachian Mountain Club Hut System and its role in the broad pattern of backcountry recreation in the White Mountains and as an example of a modern backcountry hostel, incorporating design elements from earlier hut examples into a modern engineered structure.

Appalachian Mountain Club, completed November 2015

Bolduc Block, National Register & NH State Register Nominations
Conway, NH
National Register Nomination prepared for the Mountain Top Music Center.  The Bolduc Block is a well-preserved vernacular commercial building that was constructed in c. 1931 to house retail space and the Majestic Movie Theater.  On April 1, 2005, during a movie screening, a multi-alarm fire broke out inside the Majestic Theater section of the Bolduc Block, destroying most of the interior of the theater section.
The Mountain Top Music Center is in the process of renovating the historic theater for use as a music school.
State Register Completed June 2015 and Listed to the State Register October 2015.

National Register of Historic Places Nomination completed March 2016
Listed to the National Register of Historic Places September 20, 2016

Jaffrey Meetinghouse, Historic Property Documentation
Jaffrey, NH
New Hampshire Historic Property Documentation of the 1776 Jaffrey Meetinghouse, a contributing resource in the National Register listed Jaffrey Center Historic District was conducted with Paul Wainright, photographer, and Catlin + Petrovick Architects, PC.  The Jaffrey Meetinghouse is significant for its association with the development of the Town of Jaffrey and for its architecture, as an example of a Georgian meetinghouse.   This Meetinghouse has played a very central role in both the civic and religious development of Jaffrey.  When it was first constructed, the Meetinghouse was the focal point of activity in Jaffrey.  Like with many other early meetinghouses, the layout of the roads and houses were determined by the placement of the meetinghouse and associated common. The meetinghouse was constructed as an early communal effort.  The raising united the people of Jaffrey both in spirit and physically, as they worked together to hoist the heavy frame.  The Jaffrey Meetinghouse is an excellent example of a second-period barn type meetinghouse.  The exterior of the structure maintains many details that are characteristic of a Georgian meetinghouse, including general form and massing, fenestration, and some trim details. 
For more information on this project, please visit the project’s website at: http://www.rs41.org/CLG/clg.htm
Town of Jaffrey, Completed September 2015

Newington Town Wide Mapping Project
Newington, NH
Certified Local Government (CLG) grant-funded mapping study to create a series of maps showing 400 years of change in land use and transportation patterns to demonstrate the impact of development as the town changed from a farming community to a suburb of Portsmouth.  Historic maps were digitized and entered into the town’s ESRI Arc View GIS database and then analyzed in the form of a written report.  Recommendations for future study were made based on an analysis of what was done in the past, what has been missed, and what needs more attention moving forward.
Newington Historic District Commission, Completed August 2015

Belmont Mill, NH State Register Nomination
Belmont, NH
State Register Nomination prepared for the Belmont Heritage Commission.  The Belmont Mill was constructed in 1834 and was central to the developmental history of the Town of Belmont.  Factory Village was built around the Badger Mill, and the village evolved into what we now know as the town of Belmont as the Badger Mill grew into the Gilmanton Mill and evolved into the Belmont Mill.  This mill complex was the driving force in Belmont’s economy throughout the evolution from a locally-capitalized cotton mill in the 1830s to a highly mechanized hosiery factory with world-wide distribution in the 20th century.
Belmont Heritage Commission, Completed June 2015
Listed to the New Hampshire State Register October 2015

Rogers House, Historic Building Assessment
Lebanon, NH
Historic Building Assessment of the Rogers House senior living facility, conducted for the Lebanon Housing Authority in cooperation with Jerry Wuebbolt of Right-Trak Design, Inc.  The Rogers House is a contributing element of the National Register-listed Coburn Park Historic District.  It was constructed in 1911 as a hotel by George Rogers, a prominent local businessman whose influence can be detected throughout the City of Lebanon.  The Rogers Hotel was acquired and converted into designated senior housing in the late 1960s, and renamed Rogers House.
Lebanon Housing Authority, Completed June 2015

Creek Farm, Historic Structures Report
Portsmouth, NH
Historic Structures Report of the Arthur Astor Carey summer house or “Creek Farm” for the NH Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests with Norman E. Larson , AIA of Christopher P. Williams, Architects of Meredith, NH.  Creek Farm was designed by Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow, Jr. of Boston.  Construction began on the structure in 1887 with at least four major architectural phases completed before 1900.  The house is an outstanding representative of the summer home movement in New Hampshire, a rare survivor of an artistic summer colony at Little Harbor, Portsmouth, and is significant for its associations with both Arthur Astor Carey (1857-1923) and Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow, Jr (1854-1934).
Society for the Protection of NH Forests, Completed May 2015

Hilltop School, National Register Nomination
Somersworth, NH

National Register Nomination prepared for the City of Somersworth, NH. Georgian Revival style Hilltop School (formerly Somersworth High School) was constructed in 1927 on the location of the former Great Falls High School. The structure was designed by prominent Boston architect Charles Greely Loring. The Hilltop School is significant for Criterion A of the National Register for the important role it played in the development of modern high school education on a local level.  The school was constructed as a cutting-edge high school at an important moment in the development of the modern high school.  The Hilltop School is significant under Criterion C as an example of a 1920s school building that was designed by a well-known area architect in the Colonial Revival/Georgian Revival style.  It retains integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association for both of these criteria, despite minor changes to the building such as additional interior fire doors, dropped ceilings, and replacement windows.
City of Somersworth, Completed December 2014.
Listed to the National Register of Historic Places October 2015.

Somersworth Hilltop School
Center Harbor Townhouse

Center Harbor Townhouse, NH State Register Nomination
Center Harbor, NH

State Register Nomination prepared for the Town of Center Harbor, NH. The Center Harbor Townhouse was constructed in 1843, as a geographically centralized meeting place for the town. The meetinghouse has a high degree of architectural integrity and maintains significance for its important role in the development of the surrounding town.
Town of Center Harbor, Completed December 2014.
Listed to the New Hampshire State Register February 2015.

Download Inventory Form

Survey of Extant Historic Carriage Houses and Urban Barns within Concord’s West End Neighborhood
Concord, NH
Windshield survey of surviving carriage houses and urban barns within a section of Concord’s West End neighborhood, recording each property at a reconnaissance level, with a focus on the carriage house/urban barn. Also created a contextual document giving a thematic overview of historic carriage houses and urban barns within the defined study area to provide an historic background narrative of the individual barns and their relationship to both the individual residences and neighborhood as a whole. This survey also will provide an overview of character defining features of these buildings in order to help the Heritage Commission be more proactive in working with the planning department. This project is done under a Certified Local Government Grant as a consultant through Christopher P. Williams, Architects of Meredith, NH.
City of Concord Planning Department Completed Fall 2014.

Download Area Form

Concord Carriage Barn
Bath Congregational Church

Bath Congregational Church, NH State Register Nomination
Bath, NH

State Register Nomination prepared for the Congregational Church in Bath, NH. The Gothic Revival church was constructed in 1873 in the center of Bath Village, adjacent to the 1832 Bath Covered Bridge. This church has a very high level of architectural integrity and is a fine example of the Gothic Revival style.
Preservation Methods and Documentation Professor: Elizabeth Muzzey, SHPO
Listed to the New Hampshire State Register November 2013.

Download Inventory Form


Pine Ledge, Historic Structures Report
Holderness, NH

Historic Structures report and architectural analysis prepared for class instructed by James Garvin, former State Architectural Historian. Pine Ledge is a contributing element of the Shepard Hill National Register district and is a fine example of a shingle-style summer cottage. It is extremely significant for its high level of architectural integrity and for its association with the history of tourism around the Squam Lakes.
Building Investigation and Evaluation Professor: Dr. James Garvin, Former State Architectural Historian August 2013.

Pine Ledge
Asquam House Hotel

Preservation Without Reservations
Holderness, NH
Analysis of the boom and decline of motels and cabin colonies on Route 3 along the shore of Squam Lake. Project included an historical analysis of the development of tourism along Route 3, and its wane in recent decades. Comparative analysis with similar types of resources in other parts of the country and what is being done to bring people back to these rapidly vanishing structures was an essential element in constructing a plan to apply to New Hampshire.
Preservation Planning & Management Professor: Elizabeth Muzzey, SHPO June 2013.

Blue-Collar Mill-Town to Summer Destination: Shifting Economies in Small Town New Hampshire
Meredith, NH
Analysis of the history of the economy of Meredith, New Hampshire as evidenced through an analysis of the connections between the culture of the town and its architecture. How have cultural and economic shifts affected the landscape of the town, changing it from a walk-able working town to a sprawling tourist destination that was shifted away from the main street? Analysis included suggestions as to how to make the main street more inviting and reinvigorate the downtown.
Rural Cultural Environment Professor: Dr. Ben Amsden, Center for Rural Partnerships February 2013.

Route 3, Meredith
Laconia State School

Laconia State School for the Feeble-Minded: Laconia's Chance to take a Stand for Sustainability
Laconia, NH
How do we approach the preservation of places that are associated with aspects of our past that we may rather forget? Analysis of possible futures for the Laconia State School property within the context of its past, what has been done across the country with similar campuses, and communal needs. How can this campus, and the energy its land and building embody, best be utilized going forward?
Sustainability & Historic Preservation Professor: Mary Kate Ryan, NH State Survey Coordinator November 2012.

Uvdal Stave Church
Numendal, Norway

“From Dragon Myth to the Gospels: The Stave Church at Uvdal” presented the first in-depth analysis of the stave church in English. This undergraduate thesis explored the connection between architectural structure and ornamentation and the conversion from paganism to Christianity in a rural Norwegian parish. Uvdal has been dated using dendrochronology to 1167, and is a fine example of one of the few surviving typical parish churches that once dotted the Medieval Norwegian countryside.
Undergraduate Thesis: Bard College May 2004.

Uvdal Stave Church